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Price List

Vaccination Information & Prices

Price per dose:

  1. £75 during monthly clinic (check clinic date here)
  2. £100 outside scheduled clinic (Mon-Sat – call to book an appointment)

Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: Birth onwards
When a booster dose given (in years): None required


We use the only BCG vaccine licensed in the UK (BCG Vaccine AJV – made in Denmark) approved to be used by the NHS and supplied to us by the same supplier to the NHS. For more information see our BCG page.

Price per dose: £70

Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: Birth onwards
When a booster dose given (in years):


BCG should not be administered to an individual with a positive TB skin test – it is unnecessary and may cause a more severe local reaction.  BCG can be given up to three months following a negative tuberculin test.


A tuberculin skin test is necessary prior to BCG vaccination for:

  1. all individuals aged six years or over
  2. infants and children under six years of age with a history of residence or prolonged stay (more than three months) in a country with an annual TB incidence of 40/100,000 or greater
  3. those who have had close contact with a person with known TB
  4. those who have a family history of TB within the last five years.

Giving Tuberculin skin testing (Mantoux) and MMR vaccine:

If a tuberculin skin test has already been initiated, then MMR should be delayed until the skin test has been read unless protection against measles is required urgently. If a child has had a recent MMR, and requires a tuberculin test, then a four week interval should be observed.


The results should be read 48 to 72 hours after the test is taken, but a valid reading can
usually be obtained up to 96 hours later (Ref: The Green Book, Feb 2019):

Price per dose: £24

A certificate will be provided.
Number of doses for primary course:
Minimum dose intervals:
Age:
When a booster dose given (in years):

Price per dose: £70
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: 3 month for 9-12 months of age & 1 year+ 4 weeks
Age: 9 month+
When a booster dose given (in years): None required


Giving Chickenpox (varicella) and MMR vaccines:

If these vaccines are not administered on the same day, then a four week minimum interval should be observed between vaccines.

Price per dose: £30
Number of doses for primary course: 2 for 6 years+ & 3 for 2-6 years
Minimum dose intervals: 1 week
Age: 2+
When a booster dose given (in years): 2 years for 6 years+ & 6 months for 2-6 years of age


Can this vaccine provide protection against travellers diarrhoea?

In clinical trials Dukoral has shown efficacy in protecting against infection by ETEC (Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli), a common cause of travellers’ diarrhoea.
The vaccine is not licensed in the UK for use in protecting against either ETEC infection or travellers’ diarrhoea (only licensed for cholera); this vaccine may be considered for travellers’ diarrhoea for

  1. Travellers for whom even a brief episode of diarrhoea could be consequential (e.g. other underlying medical condition).
  2. Travellers prone to severe diarrhoea.

Price per dose: £32
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 6+
When a booster dose given (in years): 10


Why do we give tetanus boosters to travellers when only five doses of tetanus are needed for life in the UK with no additional boosters?

It is correct that only five doses of tetanus are needed for life in the UK, but this is on the assumption that if someone needed a tetanus booster or immunoglobulin (e.g. in the event of a tetanus prone wound) they would be able to access the appropriate treatment easily.

We give boosters to travellers if we cannot be sure they would be able to quickly access appropriate treatment easily. Particularly in countries where medical facilities and supplies are scarce, obtaining tetanus immunoglobulin might be difficult. Rather than take this chance, we would give them further vaccine before departure.

Price per dose: £48
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 16+
When a booster dose given (in years): 25 years after the 2nd dose

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I had one dose of hepatitis A vaccine many years ago but did not complete the course. Should I restart the whole course of vaccination now?

There is no need to restart the whole course of vaccination – one dose now will be sufficient to complete the course.


How long does it take for hepatitis A vaccine to give protection?

Approximately 14 days after the primary vaccination. The average incubation period for hepatitis A infection is 28 days (and can be 3 – 5 weeks) so it may still be worthwhile giving the vaccine at short notice prior to travel.

Price per dose: £44
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 1-15
When a booster dose given (in years): 25 years after the 2nd dose

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Price per dose: £85
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 15+
When a booster dose given (in years): See individual vaccines

Price per dose: £39
Number of doses for primary course: 3 or 4
Minimum dose intervals: 0, 1, 2 months (3 dose schedule – if there is not enough time, 2 doses provide reasonable protection before travel) or rapid schedules: 0, 7, 21 days & 12 months (4 dose schedule).

Age: 16+
When a booster dose given (in years): None required for travel


For travellers who have completed a primary course of vaccination, a single booster dose of vaccine at five years is not required, unless they are considered to be at continuing risk of infection e.g. regular traveller to areas with poor health care and high incidence of hepatitis B carrier rate. They would also be advised to have a booster if in an at risk situation e.g. needle stick injury. Any traveller with an underlying medical condition that may compromise their response to vaccine should consider a test.


When are rapid schedules used in preference to the standard schedule?

Suitable for travellers who require maximum protection but do not have time for the standard 3 dose schedule.


Why do the rapid schedules have a 4th dose of vaccine?

The additional 4th dose at 12 months is given because some initial protection from the 3 rapid doses may be lost. This only applies to infants who are at continued risk and those who receive the very rapid schedule on days 0, 7 and 21.

Price per dose: £35
Number of doses for primary course: 3
Minimum dose intervals: 0, 1, 2 months
Age: 0-15
When a booster dose given (in years): None required for travel


Now that hepatitis B vaccine is included in the UK national schedule, does this mean we no longer need to vaccinate children travellers?

Children born after August 1st 2017 will receive hepatitis B vaccine and will be protected after completion of the course of vaccination. Children born before 1st August 2017 will not have been given hepatitis B vaccine routinely and may therefore still need to be considered prior to travel or as routine immunisation given privately.

Price per dose: £88
Number of doses for primary course: 3 or 4
Minimum dose intervals: 0, 1, 6 months (3 dose schedule – if there is not enough time, 2 doses provide reasonable protection before travel) or rapid schedules: 0, 7, 21 days & 12 months (4 dose schedule).


Age: 16+
When a booster dose given (in years): See individual vaccines

Price per dose: £85
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: 0 & 6-12 months 
Age: 1-15
When a booster dose given (in years): See individual vaccines

Price per dose: £135
Number of doses for primary course: 2 for 9-14 years & 3 for over 14
Minimum dose intervals: 0, 1, 4 months
Age: 9+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required

Price per dose: £165
Number of doses for primary course: 2 for 9-14 years & 3 for over 14
Minimum dose intervals: 0, 1, 4 months
Age: 9+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required


HPV and Men – Fact Sheet

Price per dose: £15 fo 3 years+  &  £25 for 6-23 months of age 
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 6 months+
When a booster dose given (in years): 1

Usually available from Sep to Jan each year.

The inserts of the 2019-20 flu vaccines we use:

6-23 months of age: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/666/pil

3-64 years of age: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/9382/pil

65 and over: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/9223/pil

Price per dose: £40
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 2-18
When a booster dose given (in years): 1

Usually available from Sep to Jan each year.

Price per dose: £95
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: Standard schedule: 0 & 28 day – Rapid schedule: 0 & 7 day. 

Age: 2 month+
When a booster dose given (in years): 2 years for 1st booster and *10 years for 3rd booster


What are the benefits of the rapid schedule versus the normal day 0 and 28 day schedule?

The main benefit of the rapid schedule is that it can be used for those travellers leaving in less than one month. Ideally both doses should be given at least one week prior to exposure to Japanese encephalitis.


When do I need to give a booster following the rapid schedule?

The 1st booster (for the purpose of travel) is the same after standard or rapid primary schedule.

  • Children (from 2 months) and adults under 65 years: boost 12-24 months after primary immunisation and prior to potential re-exposure to Japanese encephalitis virus.
  • Adults 65 years of age and older: consider boost at 12 months for those at risk.

2nd booster (4th dose)

  • 10 years after 1st booster (3rd dose) should be offered to those that remain at risk *(the 10 year protection is only applied to adults 18-64 years of age – all other ages, if at risk, require a booster dose after 2 years).

Price per dose: £120
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: 1-3 months
Age: 1+*
When a booster dose given (in years): Usually not required


In the UK, apart from the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine which is the only measles containing vaccine with UK marketing authorisation (i.e. a product license), all other measles containing vaccines do not have a UK marketing authorisation.  The single measles vaccine we use has a marketing authorisation in Switzerland and is imported for us under UK regulations by one of the most established medicine importers in the UK.  We have been using the same single measles vaccine for several years in our clinic.  We only offer this vaccines to people who have refused / cannot be given the MMR.

We have no single or combination of mumps and/or rubella vaccines.

To be able to guarantee the supply of this vaccine for you, we have to charge you  in advance when you book your appointment over the phone; this is £120 in total for each dose per appointment.

To see the official insert of this vaccine and name of its ingredients click here: Single Measles Vaccine Product License in English.

Generic Name – Live Measles Virus, Edmonston-Zagreb strain

Country of License – Switzerland

Licence Holder – PaxVax Berna GmbH

Product Licence – 58506


• Individuals 1 year of age and over require two doses of a measles containing vaccines
• Doses of MMR/measles vaccine given prior to 12 months of age should not be counted
• Two doses of MMR/measles vaccine should be given irrespective of history of measles, mumps or rubella infection and/or age
* Infants from six months of age travelling internationally:
Countries with measles outbreaks are not the only places where infection is a risk. There are many countries where measles spreads routinely; some of them may have more measles cases than countries experiencing outbreaks. Airports, public transportation, and tourist attractions are also places where measles can spread. It is critical, therefore, for all international travelers to be protected against measles, regardless of their destination. (CDC – Global Measles Outbreak Notice link)

See the below links for more information on measles:

1. Measles cases at an alarming level in the European Region (May 2019):

2. Vaccination of individuals with uncertain or incomplete immunisation status

3. Ensure all travellers are up to date with measles vaccination


If the measles containing vaccine is given to someone who turns out to be already immune either due to previous infection or previous vaccination, will it do any harm?

No. There are no ill effects from vaccinating such individuals as they will have pre existing immunity that inhibits replication of the vaccine viruses.


Giving Yellow Fever and MMR vaccines:

A four week minimum interval period should be observed between the administration of these two vaccines. Yellow Fever and MMR should not be administered on the same day.

Giving Chickenpox (varicella) and MMR vaccines:

If these vaccines are not administered on the same day, then a four week minimum interval should be observed between vaccines.

Giving Tuberculin skin testing (Mantoux) and MMR vaccines:

If a tuberculin skin test has already been initiated, then MMR should be delayed until the skin test has been read unless protection against measles is required urgently. If a child has had a recent MMR, and requires a tuberculin test, then a four week interval should be observed.

Price per dose: £115
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: 1-2 months depends on the age
Age: 2 months+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required

Price per dose: £60
Number of doses for primary course: Birth to less than one year: 2 doses given 1 month apart – From one year of age (including adults): 1 dose only.  Based on recommendation from the Green Book.
Minimum dose intervals: See above.
Age: Birth onward 
When a booster dose given (in years): 5 years for travel

Price per dose: £37
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: 4 weeks
Age: 1+*
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required

*Infants from six months of age

All travellers to epidemic or endemic areas should ensure that they are fully immunised according to the UK schedule.  Infants from six months of age travelling to measles endemic areas with a high incidence of measles or to an area where there is a current outbreak, who are likely to be mixing with the local population, should receive MMR.  As the response to MMR in infants is sub-optimal where the vaccine has been given before one year of age, immunisation with two further doses of MMR should be given at the recommended ages.  Children who are travelling who have received one dose of MMR at the routine age should have the second dose brought forward to at least one month after the first.  If the child is under 18 months of age, then the routine pre-school dose (a third dose) should be given in order to ensure full protection. (Green Book, chapter 21).

There is good evidence that administering measles-containing vaccines to infants younger than 9 months induces a good immune response, confers protection, and is safe.  Administration of MMR vaccine to children under 9 months constitutes off-label (unlicensed) use of the vaccine but should be considered.


Where are measles outbreaks occurring?

Before you travel internationally, check the destination information for your intended destination to see if there is an outbreak of measles occurring there. Countries with measles outbreaks are not the only places where infection is a risk, however. There are many countries where measles spreads routinely; some of them may have more measles cases than countries experiencing outbreaks. Airports, public transportation, and tourist attractions are also places where measles can spread. It is critical, therefore, for all international travelers to be protected against measles, regardless of their destination. (CDC – Global Measles Outbreak Notice link)


Recommendations for measles vaccinations for travellers:

  1. Infants (6 through 11 months old). One dose of a measles containing vaccine should be given. This dose does not count as the first dose in the routine childhood vaccination series.
  2. People 12 months old or older, without other presumptive evidence of measles immunity. Two appropriately spaced doses of a measles containing vaccine should be given.
  3. People 12 months old or older who have written documentation of one dose and no other presumptive evidence of measles immunity. One additional dose before travel.

There is now overwhelming evidence that MMR does not cause autism.

Also, it has been suggested that combined MMR vaccine could potentially overload the immune system. From the moment of birth, humans are exposed to countless numbers of foreign antigens and infectious agents in their everyday environment. Responding to the three viruses in MMR would use only a tiny proportion of the total capacity of an infant’s immune system. The three viruses in MMR replicate at different rates from each other and would be expected to reach high levels at different times (Green Book, chapter 21).


1. Measles cases at an alarming level in the European Region (May 2019):

2. Vaccination of individuals with uncertain or incomplete immunisation status

3. Ensure all travellers are up to date with measles vaccination


If the measles containing vaccine is given to someone who turns out to be already immune either due to previous infection or previous vaccination, will it do any harm?

No. There are no ill effects from vaccinating such individuals as they will have pre existing immunity that inhibits replication of the vaccine viruses.


Giving Yellow Fever and MMR vaccines:

A four week minimum interval period should be observed between the administration of these two vaccines. Yellow Fever and MMR should not be administered on the same day.

Giving Chickenpox (varicella) and MMR vaccines:

If these vaccines are not administered on the same day, then a four week minimum interval should be observed between vaccines.

Giving Tuberculin skin testing (Mantoux) and MMR vaccines:

If a tuberculin skin test has already been initiated, then MMR should be delayed until the skin test has been read unless protection against measles is required urgently. If a child has had a recent MMR, and requires a tuberculin test, then a four week interval should be observed.

Price per dose: £50
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 2+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required


This is the pneumococcal vaccine offered to adults 65 years of age and over on the NHS.

PCV13 is NOT offered to adults 65 years of age and over on the NHS.

Price per dose: £100
Number of doses for primary course: 1 for adults
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 6 weeks+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required


The vaccine helps protect against the 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly cause serious infections in children and adults. It can also help prevent ear infections and pneumonia caused by those 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria. Pneumonia is the most common clinical presentation of pneumococcal disease in adults.

Pneumococcal disease is caused by bacteria that can spread from person to person through close contact. It can cause ear infections, and it can also lead to more serious infections of the:

  • Lungs (pneumonia),
  • Blood (bacteremia), and
  • Covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis).

This is the pneumococcal vaccine NOT offered to adults on the NHS.

Price per dose:

Intramuscular (IM) injection: £70 depends on stock availability
Number of doses for primary course: 3 if given with minimum intervals of 0, 7, 21 days, otherwise if no time, 4 doses required given at 0, 3, 7 & 365 days.
Minimum dose intervals: Conventional regimen: 0, 7, 21 days – Rapid Regimen (adults only – if not able to complete the conventional regimen): 0, 3, 7 & 365 days.

Intradermal (ID) injection: £50 – Available on certain days only.  Currently the manufacturers of rabies vaccines do not have UK marketing authorisation for administration of the rabies vaccine by ID injection.  However, the ID injection of rabies vaccine is supported by World Health Organization (see page 10 & 13).

Age: Birth onward

When a booster dose given (in years): see below

Current pre-exposure prophylaxis recommendations in England

*** The need for boosters will depend on the activities being undertaken by the traveller, the rabies risk in the country being visited and the ability to access post-exposure medical care and rabies biologics. A booster may also be considered for those travellers with primary vaccination more than five years previously.


Key in the risk assessment when deciding when to vaccinate is whether post exposure treatment, which is necessary following an animal bite, is readily available. Post exposure treatment in someone who has not been vaccinated entails immediate first aid, administration of Human Rabies Specific Immunoglobulin (HRIG) followed by a course of five rabies vaccinations over 28 days. The HRIG and first dose of vaccine should ideally be started within 24 hours of the bite being inflicted. HRIG is known to be very difficult or impossible to obtain in many countries, so unvaccinated travellers who receive an animal bite may need to travel to another country or even come home for treatment.

#BeRabiesAware


If you have rabies vaccine prior to travel does this mean that you don’t need any treatment if you get an animal bite while away?

No – they will still need treatment but this is much simpler and more as a precaution rather than an emergency. After the full course or pre-exposure rabies vaccine, a fully immunocompetent recipient should produce protective antibodies against rabies. Immediate first aid should be carried after any animal bite. In the event of an animal bite in a high or intermediate risk area, this should be followed up with two further doses of rabies vaccine on days 0 and 3, to be given as quickly as possible after the animal bite. HRIG is not needed.


If a traveller is bitten by an animal, how would they know if the animal has rabies or not?

You cannot tell by looking at an animal whether it has rabies or not as symptoms are not always apparent. Although it is possible to determine whether an animal has rabies through laboratory testing (usually on a dead animal), for most travellers this is impossible.

Rabies, once symptoms develop, is always fatal, so every animal bite in a high risk area should be treated as an emergency.

In countries where there is a low risk of animal rabies, travellers should still have any bite assessed quickly to ascertain if further action is required.

Remember, even in countries with no risk of animal rabies, bats may be infected.


How can I find out whether HRIG is available in the country my traveller is going to?

In most cases you can’t. HRIG is not in plentiful supply anywhere. Though it can be found when needed in most developed countries, in underdeveloped countries, including those with the highest risk of rabies, it will be very difficult or impossible to obtain HRIG.

It is worth noting that HRIG is produced from blood products, so even though this is essential for treatment for someone not previously vaccinated, it may pose a risk in itself in many countries.


What is the advice to travellers about monkey bites?

Travellers should be advised to never handle or feed monkeys. Should a traveller sustain a monkey bite or scratch then prompt first aid is important. Thorough irrigation is important and as with any infection, use of a chlorhexidine containing soap or detergent will reduce the transmission of infection.

Post exposure rabies treatment should be administered.

Tetanus vaccine +/- tetanus immunoglobulin should be given if the traveller is unvaccinated.

Antibiotic is usually advised.

Post-exposure prophylaxis for herpes B infection is unnecessary in travellers post- wild monkey bite, even from a rhesus macque monkey. Good patient education with advice to seek prompt medical attention if they develop a blistering eruption at the site of the bite or develop a ‘flu like’ illness within the 3 week post bite is important to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of any infection.

Estimated annual age-specific incidence of shingles per 100,000 per year in the immunocompetent population in England and Wales (population 2007). Data taken from van Hoek et al., 2009.

Estimated percentage developing Post Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN) by age group in the immunocompetent population in England and Wales (population 2007). Data taken from van Hoek et al., 2009.

Ref: The Green Book, Feb 2019

14 Oct 2019 – Currently, we have no stock of the new non-live shingles vaccine. If you want to be immunised by the new non-live shingles vaccine at our clinic, please join our waiting list by EMAILING us your full name and mobile number (this is not possible via telephone) at info@hhpharmacy.co.uk  No acknowledgment will be sent back.  We do keep an accurate list of people who have emailed us and we contact you as soon as we have the vaccine.
For more information, please see our shingles vaccination page here.

Price per dose: £230 (the new non-live shingles vaccine)
Number of doses for primary course: 2
Minimum dose intervals: 2
Age: 50+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required


Price per dose: £160 (the live shingles vaccine)
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals: n/a
Age: 50+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required

Price per dose: £65
Number of doses for primary course: 3
Minimum dose intervals: 0, 1, 6 months
Age: 1+
When a booster dose given (in years): 1st booster after 3 years then every 5 years

Conventional vaccination schedule:

Rapid vaccination schedule:

Providing sufficient protection after two vaccinations.


Recommended for people who live or work in, or travel to, TBE risk areas.

Price per dose: £34
Number of doses for primary course: 3
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 2+*
When a booster dose given (in years): 3


Public Health England’s Green Book Typhoid Chapter 33 recommends that children between 12 months and 2 years should be immunised with the typhoid injectable vaccine if the risk of typhoid at their destination is high, e.g. those visiting friend and family in south east Asia for 4 weeks or more.

Price per dose: £34 (same price as typhoid injection vaccine)
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 5+
When a booster dose given (in years): 3


Price per dose: £80
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 3+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required


There have been large outbreaks of pertussis, also known as whooping cough, affecting several countries in recent years. This includes the UK, Australia, Canada and USA. Duration of protection from pertussis vaccine, or from having had the disease, is relatively short-lived. It is unlikely to be more than 10 years and may be less.

The policy in the UK is to vaccinate the pregnant woman in late pregnancy. The antibodies against pertussis which she produces will cross the placenta to help protect the baby.

In some countries, an approach known as ‘cocooning’ is used. This involves vaccinating all those in close contact with the baby – for example partners, spouses, immediate family and grandparents.

Price per dose: £65
Number of doses for primary course: 1
Minimum dose intervals:
Age: 9 month+
When a booster dose given (in years): Not required


Do I need a certificate if my flight transits through a country with risk of yellow fever transmission?

Check individual country recommendations for up to date advice. It should be noted that some countries require proof of vaccination from all travellers.

Price per dose: £24
Number of doses for primary course:
Minimum dose intervals:
Age:
When a booster dose given (in years):


We issue medical letter of exemption from the requirement for an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis (ICVP) when appropriate / required – See here for more information: https://nathnacyfzone.org.uk/factsheet/6/medical-letter-of-exemption

Can a lost certificate be reissued?

Re-issuing a certificate is permissible if you have records of the dates and batch numbers from when the vaccine was administered. If not, then the only legally acceptable approach to satisfy immigration authorities is to repeat the vaccination.

Travel-related Treatments

Prices: Depends of type of medication

Notes: Full range available

Malaria prevention guidelines for travellers from the UK

Prices: £35

Circadian rhythms regulate our sleep patterns and need time to adjust to changes in local time (usually about one day per time zone crossed). Westward travel may be better tolerated than eastward travel but problems occur when travelling in both directions. The effects of jet lag include – sleep disturbance, loss of appetite, nausea and sometimes vomiting, bowel changes (e.g. constipation), general malaise, tiredness and poor concentration.

After arrival hypnotics (sleeping tablets) have been shown to help with jet lag.

Notes: For more info visit: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/the-pre-travel-consultation/jet-lag

Prices: £35

  • Travellers’ diarrhoea (TD) is the most common health problem of overseas travellers, affecting an estimated 20 to 60 percent of those who travel to high risk destinations of the world.
  • TD can be caused by viruses, bacteria or protozoa.
  • TD is difficult to prevent for those who cannot prepare their own food and drinks. Following advice on food and water hygiene is sensible, but travellers should always be prepared to manage the symptoms of TD during their travels.
  • Inappropriate antibiotic use can lead to drug resistant bowel organisms; these are unlikely to cause illness in a healthy individual, but  if spread, for example to a household contact with an underlying medical condition may lead to severe/untreatable infections.

Stand-by antibiotics is only for those at high risk of severe illness, or visiting high risk areas. For more info visit: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/the-pre-travel-consultation/travelers-diarrhea

Prices: £35

  • Altitude illness describes a number of conditions that may occur in individuals ascending rapidly to high altitude, usually above 2,500m.
  • Severe altitude illness is a life-threatening condition and requires urgent attention.
  • Preventative medications are not a substitute for gradual ascent.
  • Consider travelling with these medicines for altitude sickness:
    • A prescribed specific medicine to prevent and treat high altitude sickness
    • Simple painkilers for headaches
    • anti-sickness medication for nausea

For more info visit https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/the-pre-travel-consultation/altitude-illness

Prices: £35

If you are not using the contraceptive pill you may be able to delay your period by up to 14 days, by taking a prescribed medicine 3 to 4 days before you expect your period to begin.

From NHS Choices: How can I delay my period?

  • The price quoted above is per vaccine dose and not for a full course.
  • We are unable to book appointments via email.
  • We are a private (but competitively priced) travel & vaccination clinic, and charge for all of our services.
  • Please bring records of any past vaccinations you have received to your appointment.
  • If you wish to have a chaperone accompany you during your consultation, please let us know and we will arrange this. 
  • We do not charge any consultation fees, however should you attend an appointment and not require any vaccines or medicines, a £20 consultation fee shall apply.
  • Prices are subject to change without prior notification.
  • We accept all debit and credit cards (also via mobile payments) for purchases over £5, except American Express.
  • Stocks of particular vaccines may not always be available.
  • Refunds Policy: We cannot offer refunds or accept returns on healthcare items supplied by the clinic. Your statutory rights are unaffected.
  • Vaccinations are only undertaken following a full consultation with the pharmacist, including details of travel plans, locations to be visited within countries and your medical history. 
  • Before departure, all travellers should ensure that they are up to date with the routine NHS (or equivalent) vaccinations schedule.
  • Children aged up to 15 years must have a parent/guardian present and able to complete the consultation on their behalf.
  • It is a MYTH that you have to avoid or delay your child’s vaccination if they have a mild illness without a fever, such as a cough or cold, or if they have an allergy, such as asthma, hay fever or eczema.
  • It’s a MYTH that it is unsafe to take your baby swimming around the time of a vaccination. In fact, you can take your baby swimming at any time before and after their vaccinations.
  • If any course of vaccination is interrupted, it should be resumed and completed as soon as possible. There is generally no need to start any course of vaccination again, as immunological memory from the priming dose(s) is likely to be maintained.
  • Please bring records of any past vaccinations, the personal child health record (Red Book) and for travel consultations, the itinerary to your appointment.
  • In the absence of documentation or reliable history you cannot assume that you have been vaccinated, therefore further vaccines for protection should be given. Generally, there is no harm in repeating a vaccine which might have been given previously.
  • It is acceptable to lengthen the intervals between doses of a course, but shortening the intervals is not recommended.
  • Only a few vaccines should be administered on the same day or at the 4 week interval period; for further details see here and seek advice. Otherwise, most vaccines can be given simultaneously with or at any time before or after each other.

To book an appointment please call 020 7435 7075

Our telephone line is open Mon – Fri 9:00 to 18:30 & Saturday: 9:00 to 17:30.

Currently, our travel and vaccination clinic runs Mon-Fri (17:30 to 18:30) and Saturday (09:00 to 16:00) clinics.

We do not charge any consultation fees, however should you attend an appointment and not require any vaccines or medicines, a £20 consultation fee shall apply.

Please bring records of any past vaccinations, the personal child health record (Red Book) and for travel consultations, the itinerary to your appointment.

For more information email: info@hhpharmacy.co.uk